Over the last few months I have been writing three different books about a range of different subjects. One of the projects focuses on independent watchmakers and their fine achievements. Ultimately what I want to illustrate is what makes these artisans so special. In many instances they work in converted workshops at home, which I imagine, could be quite an isolating experience. There is also the factor that freelance work of this nature is very precarious, especially concerning finances. However, this doesn’t seem to stifle creativity and some of the timepieces I am featuring are absolutely magnificent.

A few months ago I wrote an in depth article about a historic piece called the Spider Skeleton Watch, which was manufactured by an Ukrainian company called Studio Wandolec. In fact, as this is a unique 1/1 creation, I am the only person in the world to review this amazing watch. Boris Sagaydak is the brains behind the business but he also has a very supportive team behind him. This collective comprises engravers, watchmakers, restorers, assemblers etc. The results speak for themselves as the finished timepiece are all pretty spectacular. A great example is a beautiful watch appropriately named Omega 1923 (denoting the year of the vintage movement).

Even though I didn’t personally get to inspect the Omega 1923 I can envisage the overall quality of this piece. With a case measuring 50mm it is slightly smaller than the Spider Skeleton Watch. However, it certainly is as distinctive and the ornate engravings are absolutely exquisite. What makes this timepiece so remarkable is the intricate skeletonised dial depicting a sparrow on a branch. Normally this attention to detail can only be found on watches that sell for a king’s ransom. However, this extraordinary vintage Swiss mechanical watch retails for around $2,000, which is extraordinarily good value in my opinion.

As a perfect finishing touch the Omega 1923 is equipped with a high quality leather strap and matching steel buckle.

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