A few years ago I had a very interesting meeting with a commodities broker, who also had a penchant for exquisite timepieces. Even though this discerning gentleman kept me waiting in a hotel lobby for over an hour the meeting was definitely worthwhile. During our limited time together he showed me 25 of his favourite watches from a prized collection of 250. Some of the models he possessed were very rare and exceedingly expensive. I vividly remember admiring pieces from De Bethune, MB & F, Urwerk and Vianney Halter to name just a few. As I was leaving a young lady approached the table (bypassing the presentation box of valuable watches) and commented on the model I was wearing. On that particular occasion, I was sporting an SP-1 Landship by Azimuth and she said it was the most interesting watch she had ever seen.

For several years Azimuth has enjoyed a certain amount of success creating eclectic timepieces at affordable prices. Certainly, on social media, they developed an almost cult-like following and gained a degree of recognition. However, owner Chris Long had larger ambitions and shifted operations from Singapore to Neuchâtel, Switzerland. At this stage, they also brought Swiss watchmaker Giuseppe Picchi as a partner for his technical expertise. This strategy has yielded some really positive results in the form of the Crazy Rider, Gran Turismo, Mr Roboto 2 and Twin Turbo. The company have also unveiled a second version of the Predator. I recently wrote an in-depth review for the acclaimed Escapement Magazine and have been testing it rigorously ever since. My conclusions are the Predator 2.0 is an exceptionally lightweight and comfortable watch to wear.

When I first spoke with Chris Long about the Predator 2.0 he told me to expect something very special. He aimed to retain the DNA of the original model but give the timepiece a more luxurious appearance. Certainly, the aesthetic is venturing into “Haute Horlogerie” territory and it is obvious Azimuth has matured as a brand. Ultimately the concept of the watch is similar (to its predecessor) but the overall composition is more sophisticated. Features like the enlarged angular titanium case, asymmetrical bezel with Perlage decoration and oversize bold white numerals are a triumph. Other fine details include an oversized three-dimensional minute hand with ‘Mystery’ jumping Hour indication (rotating disc) and top-mounted sculptural crown.

At the heart of the Predator 2.0 is in house mechanical hand-winding movement manufactured in Switzerland. This calibre (based on a Unitas) has been expertly modified by Giuseppe Picchi. The bridges for this mechanism have been constructed from aluminium, which vastly decrease the weight. It has also allowed Azimuth the opportunity to experiment with several different colour variants like electric blue, crimson orange, red, black, gold and silver (the version I am testing). Functionally the watch features jumping hours (displayed on a rotating disc), minutes and small seconds. The timepiece is also water-resistant to a depth of 30 metres and has a power reserve around 40-hours.

The Predator 2.0 is presented on a rubber strap with engraved folding clasp and priced competitively at CHF 5,850 (approximately $5,886). For more information about this incredible watch follow this link

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